Best Fritkot in town slides down

Various papers and travel blogs, as well as the local tourist office, regularly publish lists of the best places to eat Belgian fries in Belgium. The fritkot at Place de la Chapelle regularly makes it into the top three of Brussels. It won’t make it on mine for a while.

I still hadn’t eaten a mitraillette there, but each time I visited, I noticed quite a few guests of the nearby Youth Hostel Bruegel eating them. So a few weeks ago, I asked for a mitraillette mergez, only to be told it was unavailable – despite it being listed on the boards on either side of the counter.

Being hungry, I settled for my usual petit paquet with one of the sauces listed on the boards on either side of the counter. The sauce Americaine was unavailable too, so I was advised to have the sauce Andalouse. This happened to be available at home, after I stocked up at my local Delhaize supermarket.(Scroll to the bottom of this post for a recipe.)

I was severely disappointed, but the queue was long. The man behind me, ordered the ordinary ration of Belgian fries with the Bicky sauce listed on the boards on either side of the counter. No problems with the Bicky sauce apparently, so I decided to bear this in mind for my next visit.

I put this experience down to bad luck. They may have been out of mergez. They may have been out of the sauce Americaine and a few others on the board.

But then, my next visit put me through a similar experience. I didn’t notice any mergez on display, so skipped the mitraillette – again. Someone in front of me had a mitraillette version though. It was huge and not served on a plate. Her fries flew everywhere. The local dove-population didn’t mind this.

My turn, so I asked for a petit paquette with Bicky sauce. No, no Bicky sauce with fries. It was a special sauce to go only with hamburgers. Why list it on the boards on either side of the counter among the fries sauces, I thought.

Remembering the previous visit, I asked what choice there was in sauce? Only four – though the boards on either side of the counter listed close to ten. Miffed again, I settled for a petit paquette with sauce tartaire.

Guess what? I got the petit paquette with a sauce. But according to the price-list on either side of the counter, I had to pay the price of the ordinary helping.

Guess what? Next time, I’ll head for Frit Flagey at the Place Flagey. Or I’ll grab a bus to the European Parliament and saunter through the Leopold park behind, it to the Place Jourdan. Its fritkot, Monsieur Antoine, always ends up first on any list.

In Belgium and other parts of the EU, local supermarkets sell a variety of sauces to go with your home-made French, Belgian, Steak fries. These include sauces like curry, mustard, béarnaise, peanutbutter, mayonnaise, and a great many others – including Bicky.

As the Bicky sauce is sold by a commercial firm, I was unable to find a recipe for you to have a go at recreating a home-made version. It actually consists of a yellow dressing and a separate sauce poured over your Bicky hamburger, with a helping of sliced gherkin and fried onions. Many people don’t like it.

On the other hand, why not try creating your own version of sauce Tartaire or sauce Andalouse to go with your home-made French, Belgian, Steak fries:

Sauce Tartaire or tartare sauce
Of course, this sauce is usually served with fish. But unlike with the Bicky ado: nothing to prevent you from serving this with a helping of fries. Please remember you have to mix the ingredients well to create a creamy sauce, but chopped ingredients should still be recognisable.

200 ml mayonnaise
3 tbsp drained and chopped capers
3 tbsp drained and chopped gherkins (depending on your taste: sweet, sweet-sour, or sour)
1 small finely chopped white onion or shallot
a few drops of lemon juice
3 tbsp chopped parsley
grounded pepper (and salt if you have to)

Sauce Andalouse
Quick and easy: mix two parts mayonnaise with one part tomato paste and chopped green bell pepper and ground pepper. This is a spicy sauce.

Elaborate version:
200 ml mayonnaise
2 to 3 tbsp of tomato paste
1 tbsp chopped green bell pepper
1 tbsp chopped red bell pepper
2 tbsp chopped red onion
1 tbsp drained and chopped capers
a few drops of lemon juice
grounded pepper (and salt if you have to)
mix everything into a smooth paste but which still allows you to recognize the chopped vegetables.

Advertisements

4 thoughts on “Best Fritkot in town slides down

    • Thank you so much for your comment. It was a real let-down for me. Last time I was at Flagey, it was clear it’s also favoured by quite a few Brussels cops. 😉 But it’s nice to walk to Mr Antoine through the beautiful Leopold park or head there to eat one’s frites, mitraillette, whatever.

    • Thank you so much for your comment. Totally agree with you. The queues at Mr Antoine are impressive at times. On the other hand: it’s proof the quality is outstanding.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s